DONATE
FOR PHYSICIANS
HEALTH AND NUTRITION
ETHICAL RESEARCH & EDUCATION
MEDIA CENTER
LEGISLATIVE FOCUS
CLINICAL RESEARCH
EDUCATIONAL LITERATURE
MEMBERSHIP
SHOP

CONNECT WITH PCRM

 

 

    


Just the Facts

Toying with Children’s Health

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors passed a law banning toy giveaways in fast-food meals unless the meals contain fruits and vegetables and have reduced sodium, fat, and sugar content.
Children in San Francisco will no longer be tempted by high-fat fare with the promise of toys. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors passed a law banning toy giveaways in fast-food meals unless the meals contain fruits and vegetables and have reduced sodium, fat, and sugar content.

Fat Suit
A Brazilian man will get a $17,500 settlement from McDonald’s for the 65 pounds he gained while working for the fast-food giant for 12 years. The former manager said he felt pressure to eat the establishment’s fatty fare while on the job.

Right-Hand Chimpanzee
A new study published in the American Journal of Primatology finds that, like humans, chimpanzees tend to favor their right hand. Researchers observed 114 chimpanzees at primate rescue centers in Spain and Zambia.

Mummy Knows Best
Cancer is a modern disease caused by diet, pollution, and other environmental factors, a new study in Nature Reviews Cancer strongly suggests. Researchers found only one case of cancer in hundreds of Egyptian mummies and few references to cancer in literary evidence.

Digit Danger
Men whose index fingers are longer than their ring fingers are significantly less likely to develop prostate cancer, according to a new study in the British Journal of Cancer. Researchers compared the hands of 1,500 prostate cancer patients with those of 3,000 healthy men. Researchers say that being exposed to less testosterone in the womb results in longer index fingers and may protect against prostate cancer.

A Knockout Diet
Former NFL star Herschel Walker has a secret weapon in his ultimate fighting training regimen: a vegetarian diet. At 48 years old, Walker reports that he’s in the best shape of his life.

PCRM ILLUSTRATIONS/DOUG HALL

Animals Play
Reptiles, fish, birds, and invertebrates engage in some form of play

Reptiles, fish, birds, and invertebrates engage in some form of play, according to a new article in Science magazine. Researchers have observed parrots wrestling, octopi passing an object back and forth, and wasps possibly play-fighting by beating their antennae over another wasp.

Monkey Virus Infects Researcher
A deadly new virus appears to have jumped from a primate in a laboratory to a human researcher, causing her to become ill. This virus strain had already killed 19 monkeys housed at the laboratory.

How to Make Health Food Appealing: Call It “Junk”

carrots: eat 'em like junk food
Baby carrots are hip—at least that’s what a new $25 million marketing campaign is telling consumers. Instead of focusing on the obvious health benefits of eating carrots, this campaign projects the opposite image with the slogan “Eat ‘Em Like Junk Food.”

Diabetes Soars in China
China’s diabetes-related medical costs—already at $26 billion annually—are expected to skyrocket in the next 10 to 20 years. The prevalence of diabetes has been increasing in China as a Western diet has become more common.

Big Business
Britain’s Department of Health has invited processed food manufacturers, including PepsiCo, Mars, McDonald’s, and KFC, to help write government policy on obesity and diet-related diseases

Despite protests from health advocates, Britain’s Department of Health has invited processed food manufacturers, including PepsiCo, Mars, McDonald’s, and KFC, to help write government policy on obesity and diet-related diseases.



 

Good Medicine: NASA Monkey Radiation Experiments Canceled

Good Medicine
ARCHIVE

 
This site does not provide medical or legal advice. This Web site is for informational purposes only.
Full Disclaimer | Privacy Policy

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
5100 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Ste.400, Washington DC, 20016
Phone: 202-686-2210     Email: pcrm@pcrm.org