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The Physicians Committee




Breaking the Cheese Addiction: Step 1 The Reality Check

Cheese is one the most difficult products to give up when adopting a vegan diet. And it’s no wonder—with loads of salt and fat, your palate, like your health, hardly stands a chance. For the next several months, we will provide a step-by-step program to get the cheese out of your diet and your health on track. You can be free of the cheese!

Step 1: The Reality Check

Cheese is the No. 1 source of saturated fat (“bad” fat) in the American diet. Cheese can be upwards of 70 percent fat and, ounce for ounce, has more cholesterol than steak and more salt than tortilla chips! Not enough to convince you it’s worth pushing aside?

Consider that immediately after eating fatty foods…

  • Your triglyceride levels rise
  • Your cholesterol levels rise, contributing to plaque formation
  • Clotting factors in your blood are activated

Two hours later…

  • Your triglycerides have increased by 60 percent
  • Your blood flow has decreased by half

Three hours later…

  • The lining of your arteries has lost elasticity impeding blood flow
  • Blood vessel function has become abnormal

Four and five hours later…

  • Your blood has gotten thicker, flowing even slower than it was two hours ago
  • Your triglyceride levels have now increased by 150 percent

Still not enough? Check back next month when we move on to Step 2! In the meantime, try this tasty, no-cheese recipe: Cheesy-Beany Spread. 
 



Breaking the cheese addiction

Try this tasty, no-cheese recipe: Cheesy-Beany Spread >
 


   
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The Physicians Committee
5100 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Ste.400, Washington DC, 20016
Phone: 202-686-2210     Email: pcrm@pcrm.org