21-Day Vegan Kickstart

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Forums: Main Kickstart Forum: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Created on: 01/13/13 02:53 PM Views: 21932 Replies: 103
New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Sunday, January 13, 2013 at 2:53 PM

I am a single man 62 with type 2 diabities and had bought Dr. Barnard's book for reversing diabetes. Was glad to find this site but not sure what to do about menus. I am going to try to adapt this 21 day vegan meal plan to recomendations from the book. I find ingrediants exspensive at times and really not sure about putting it togther. First of all, how close is this standard 21 day menu to what a diabetic should follow? The recipies sound forign to me only becuase I am not a cook or use to the ingediants but am willing to give it a try. Could use support though.

Many thanks
Ron

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Sunday, January 13, 2013 at 7:34 PM

Please don't be overwhelmed by our menu. It is full of suggestions that are certainly not mandatory. While all of the recipes are appropriate for people with diabetes per Dr. Barnard's recommendations, find what works for you. A simple dish of rice, red lentils, and broccoli is more than outstanding and certainly less expensive. As long as what you are choosing is animal product-free, low in fat, and preferably less refined/low glycemic-index, you will see tremendous success!

Susan Levin, MS, RD
PCRM Director of Nutrition Education

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Monday, January 14, 2013 at 8:36 AM

It depends on what you're buying. Yes, to initially stock certain things (especially the spices) can be a little costly but they last a while. And, too, you can spread that out - pick one spice to add each week so that you can spread the cost out over time. As far as the next most expensive stuff, the veggies, look for sales on frozen versions of out of season stuff - for example, right now, it's cheaper for us to buy frozen kale than fresh; in the summer, it's usually the reverse. Things like beans, quinoa, and lentils are cheaper per serving than meat proteins (and way easier to store and prepare - no worries about things like undercooked chicken or cross contamination).

One of our favorites (on the regular dinner rotation) is quinoa chickpea pilaf with greens. Quinoa cooks faster than rice and is a protein-full grain. You can use well rinsed low sodium canned chickpeas or learn to soak and cook dry beans. Cook the quinoa, add the chickpeas, some onion and garlic, whatever seasoning you want, then add the chopped up greens (Kale, chard, spinach, whatever floats your boat). Let it heat through so the greens get just a little wilted. Serve. This one is actually so low glycemically that I have to plan for a snack later on in the evening (and even moreso if I get myself in gear and exercise after dinner!) It makes a bunch, so leftovers become lunch for the next couple of days.

--DebR

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Monday, January 14, 2013 at 12:22 PM

Hi and welcome aboard! I've been following the plan for just a week now, although I spent about a week before that trying to source ingredients. I only cooked about half of what was on last week's plan - partly because of time, partly cost and - to be honest - I was so full on what I had cooked! I said elsewhere that it's like trying to learn to cook a whole cookbook full of recipes in 3 weeks....I've learnt more new recipes in the last week than I have in years. That said...after a week I am sleeping better, have lost a few pounds, my swollen stomach has deflated(!) and all the aches and pains in my arms and legs have gone. I feel more agile and alert. It's worth it. Stick with it, don't beat yourself up if things don't go according to plan and keep checking in here, where there is a lot of support. Good luck. Smile Smile

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Monday, January 14, 2013 at 7:57 PM

Thanks to all who have sent words of support. I have bought lots of veggies and use humas instead of butter on rye bread which is great. I seem to be getting better at just putting basic foods togther without getting too fancy. I found that canned baked beans is low on fat and used with the veggie dogs is fine. I think I may have already lost a pound or two and my gloocose readings are lower.

Tonights meal consisted of leaf salad with carrot shavings toped with low fat dressing and pasta with low fat tommato sause.

When shopping I do try to choose the lowest fat products but would like advice as to what amount not to go over.. I have tried to stay below 3 and most times its either 0 or 1

Many thanks again and as you can tell I am not bothered by bad spelling!

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 2:21 AM

Sounds like you;re doing really well.

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 8:55 AM

ronjenk wrote:

Tonights meal consisted of leaf salad with carrot shavings toped with low fat dressing and pasta with low fat tommato sause.

When shopping I do try to choose the lowest fat products but would like advice as to what amount not to go over.. I have tried to stay below 3 and most times its either 0 or 1

Many thanks again and as you can tell I am not bothered by bad spelling!

The kickstart is aiming for about 10% of calories from fat total per day, so if you have a little more fat in one meal and a little less in another, that's fine. For the 'average' 2000 calorie per day diet (most nutritional/ingredient labels are based on that BTW) that would be 200 calories from fat - which is about 22 grams of fat for the day (9 calories per gram for fats so 200/9 = about 22). Keep an eye not only on the numbers in the label (and those can be deceiving - it may be 3 gms of fat but what is the serving size? it's usually unreasonably low if they want to look 'healthy') but also what is in the product - for instance, most pasta sauces are high in salt and sugars. Better choice (and less expensive) is to buy a can of low/no sodium tomato product (diced or crushed depending on how chunky you like your pasta sauce), put that in a saucepan and add a pinch of salt (as much or as little as you choose) and a nice sprinkle of "Italian seasoning" (look for the kind that is just herbs without added salt or other stuff) and some garlic and onion if you like (you can even use garlic powder and onion powder - powders not 'salts'). Heat and serve - simple, quick, tasty, low fat, lower carb (since you aren't adding sugars) and CHEAP (canned tomato products often go on sale for $1 or less per can and you can stock up).

--DebR

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 2:32 PM

ronjenk wrote:

When shopping I do try to choose the lowest fat products but would like advice as to what amount not to go over.. I have tried to stay below 3 and most times its either 0 or 1


Assuming most of your food is whole foods and you limit your packaged products, shoot for no more than 20% calories from fat. Ignore the grams of fat, as Bugsmom already pointed out it's a deceiving number. To know if something is truly low fat, judge it by it's CALORIES FROM FAT. You will find this number next to total calories. You want less than 20%, so if a serving has 100 calories, you want calories from fat to be less than 20. 200 calories, calories from fat less than 40. An easy way to compute calories from fat is to simply multiply the first two numbers in calories by 2. So if there are 310 calories, you want less than 62 calories from fat (31 x 2).

You also want to make sure there are no bad fats in the ingredient list, like saturated, trans or hydrogenated fats. Some examples; shortening, margerine, palm oil, coconut, cocoa butter, and all the wonderful milk fats of course.

For more information on how to read labels, watch this short video by Jeff Novick...

Should I Eat That?

He also has a full detailed article on his rules for label reading here...

Understanding Food Labels

(If you hate math and don't want to figure out the % of calories from fat, you can just make sure there are no more than 2 grams of fat per 100 calories.)

Edited 01/15/13 2:35 PM
RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Wednesday, January 16, 2013 at 7:10 AM

again many thanks for all this help! I am so glad to stumble upon first Dr. Banard's book and then this site! Living alone in a city with few contacts (due to job travel) I have been trying to go all of this mostly alone and certainly appreachate you all.

Another question: Is it normal to have, what I see, as rapid wieght loss in the begining? I have lost about 4 Lbs in 5 days. Now I am not compaling as I am about 40 lbs overwieght but loosing another lb will put me at a wieght I havent seen in about 5 years or so. My ultimatit goal is to get my wieght down below 200 lbs (started this program 5 days ago with a weight of 224) but wanted to ask if this rapid weight loss in the begining is normal.

Thanks again

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Wednesday, January 16, 2013 at 8:36 AM

In general, yes, some people do see a rapid weight loss right off and then it levels off to a slower more steady loss after a time. Those with a lot to lose and a big change going on (more water, more fiber, less highly processed high fat foods) will see more change than someone who is making maybe an incremental change, just dropping cheese from an already vegetarian lower fat way of eating.
--DebR

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Wednesday, January 16, 2013 at 8:39 AM

I lost 4 lbs in my first week (last week). This is my first time doing this diet, but I know from experience of Weight Watchers and Slimming World in the past, that people often do lose 5-6 lbs in their first (maybe even 2 or 3) weeks. It never happened to me! SadNo, not jealous at all - really pleased for you. Very Happy

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Wednesday, January 16, 2013 at 9:45 AM

try not to think of this as a diet in the same catagory as WW and others...this is a way of feeding your body what it needs to be and stay healthy, Nutrition and all it incompasses like vitamines, minerals,micronutrients,fiber,protien are the focus. Have fun experimenting with new foods and recipes learned here that are heavy on nutrients and low on fat ...the weight will come off and you will be healthier,feel amazing and look more fantastic then on any other program.

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Wednesday, January 16, 2013 at 11:41 AM

I agree. I only made the comparison with slimming groups to make the point that when people change their way of eating, it is possible to lose a few pounds in the first week. However, I don't think of this as a diet at all. My health has improved so dramatically in just a week, that I fully intend this to be the first 3 weeks of a 'way of life'.

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Wednesday, January 16, 2013 at 1:22 PM

This is great - I'm just starting tomorrow. A lot of my questions about how to get started were answered here.

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Thursday, January 17, 2013 at 6:26 AM

5 day update...still loosing weight at a bit of a slower rate but at 220 now so anything below that will put me at a place I havent seen in over 5 years.

I really am trying to make the mental switch to "wqy of life" and not "another diet" and think I am doing better with that.

Found I love pears cut up on lettice with cukes and low fat dressing. I still find many of the recipies difficult mainly to my lack of cooking interest and prep time.

My retention on learning seems to be slower these days so still trying to get a solid understandint about reading labels and whats good and not so until I get that down solid I am sticking to lots of veggies, fruit, vegan meats (although I really dont miss the absince of meat) rye breads and oatmeal.

Blood sugar has been spot on every morning the last 5 days so that is a big change.

I think im in for the long term! Many thanks Wink

Edited 01/17/13 6:28 AM
RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Thursday, January 17, 2013 at 8:37 AM

ronjenk wrote:


My retention on learning seems to be slower these days so still trying to get a solid understandint about reading labels and whats good and not so until I get that down solid I am sticking to lots of veggies, fruit, vegan meats (although I really dont miss the absince of meat) rye breads and oatmeal.

Working from plain ingredients and not prepared items makes this a lot easier - no label reading involved when lettuce is lettuce and black beans are black beans and rice is rice.
Be sure you've read the label on the rye bread - most commercial breads hide a lot of stuff you wouldn't put in a loaf if you baked it yourself. I suppose that makes a handy criteria - "if I had the time/skill/energy to make this item at home, would the recipe look like this?" In some cases, YES, the product is made with the same things you'd use at home (like peanut butter that just says "Roasted peanuts" on the label). Other stuff, not so much (bread with high fructose corn syrup, dough conditioners, etc). Even if you don't know all the ins and outs, if it's something you might have in your kitchen, it's probably "okay" in general (though salt, oil, sugar might need a look-see for the range you want).

--DebR

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Thursday, January 17, 2013 at 11:19 AM

Excited that you're seeing positive changes already. I'm looking at this as an exciting adventure instead of a chore. Keep posting your impressions, questions, and what you've learned. Helpful for us following along. You're 5 days ahead of me!!!

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Friday, January 18, 2013 at 7:28 AM

In my work I travel a lot (gone from home almost 6 months a year) and I think it will be a real challange to take this "on the road". Twice in the past week I had to eat in resturants and both times was hard pressed to find anything I felt "safe" with to order. The choices were severaly limited with not much imagination. First place (Chinese) I ordered tofu and vegtable dish (only vegan thing on thier lunch menu) and as I was eating it I wondered what all they put in it! Second time at another place I had to look through the menu 3 times before I found vegetable fajita's smothered in mushrooms and again wondered, whats that sauce. This is going to be a real challange especially next month when I go on a 12 day work trip. Guess I will have to rreally hunt down some vegan eateries and stop wondering what the local tavern puts in its stirfry!

Finally broke the 220 wieght barrier today! Thanks again for coments and support.

One last thing, I found I over shopped when I started this and have fresh foods quickly spoiling. Not uncommon for a single person I supose but I see I will need to make more frequient trips to the store and buy smaller amoutns more often to keep it fresh.

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Friday, January 18, 2013 at 8:18 AM

ronjenk wrote:

The choices were severaly limited with not much imagination. First place (Chinese) I ordered tofu and vegtable dish (only vegan thing on thier lunch menu) and as I was eating it I wondered what all they put in it! Second time at another place I had to look through the menu 3 times before I found vegetable fajita's smothered in mushrooms and again wondered, whats that sauce. This is going to be a real challange especially next month when I go on a 12 day work trip. Guess I will have to rreally hunt down some vegan eateries and stop wondering what the local tavern puts in its stirfry!

Learn to ask questions, don't just wonder, and recognize that they are there to serve you - you can mix and match from stuff they have, you aren't limited to how they've combined things. I've asked places that have tortillas (for wraps) and a mushroom, onion, bell pepper saute that they serve with steaks to give me a tortilla and the mushroom side dish made a 'fajita'ish type option (many places do have veggie fajitas BTW - since the dairy is on the side to start with, you can either ignore it or ask them to 'hold' the cheese and sour cream). The hardest part is finding no added oil, but in the bigger picture, if I had to choose between something sauted in a little oil or having no vegan option, I'd choose the oil saute.

Italian restaurants - basic pasta (some places even have whole wheat pasta available if you ask) with marinara is vegan.
Tex-Mex - bean burritos, veggie fajitas, and others. If there's a Plaza Azteca (chain Mexican food), they have a 'vegetarian' section on their menu - and it's easy to just ask for 'no cheese' on your order (and they make awesome guacamole to order tableside so you can pick just how much spice you want in it!)
"American" - some places are now adding vegetarian type options to their menu, which are usually easy to 'veganize' (some already are but they aren't called that). For instance, Red Robin chain has two options - a veggie patty and a black bean patty - that can be subbed for any of their burger options. Ruby Tuesday has a "salad bar and sides" menu item, so you can get grilled zucchini, roasted spaghetti squash, and sugar snap peas plus the full salad bar (without having to actually 'change' the menu). They also do an awesome spaghetti squash marinara entree. The upside of learning chains is that they are basically the same everywhere so you don't have to 're-learn' the menu from town to town - if you know that in Boston you had a veggie entree at Restaurant X, and you go to the Restaurant X branch in Seattle, it's going to be virtually identical as far as ingredients.
And, don't overlook the local diners - they can often put something together for you, from what they've got on the menu. If nothing else, you can usually get a bowl of oatmeal any time of day or night at most diners.
--DebR

RE: New here and new to everything-diabetic
Posted Saturday, January 19, 2013 at 8:42 AM

Day 7 - gloucose level took a dip this morning but from about a 6.5 to a 5.9 (havent been in the 5 range in quite some time) I did cut out my evening metforman about a week ago as that seems to be not needed now.

Weight steady at 219 and have started some excersie to aid in that (not much for exersize but like walking)

Looking for other recomendations for a prepacked spread as I find that the hummas I am using (which i picked out of the selection based on lowest fat) is still about the same as a light margerine. Discovering taste likes and dislikes which should make shopping easier.

I rad all the posts on here and find them very very helpful. I recently shared all this with two freinds and my diabities Dr. and all were very supportive (although all said they would have trouble with a vegan diet).

Still determined to be in for the long run (even if I havent run since I was 9)

Many thanks Very Happy


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