21-Day Vegan Kickstart

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Forums: Main Kickstart Forum: feel defeated, how to get back on track
Created on: 07/11/13 03:20 AM Views: 500 Replies: 2
feel defeated, how to get back on track
Posted Thursday, July 11, 2013 at 3:20 AM

i have a tendency to eat too fast or emotionally eat, i guess it has a lot to do with my living situation right now ( don't have money to move out, still with parents, frustrations with life/job decisions etc )

anyhow...i always beat myself up over this, and though i don't binge on non-vegan things, i do have a problem with 'trigger' foods i guess, that are still vegan like peanut butter, and frostings. frosting i know is just terrible since it's trans-fat loaded...if anyone has ideas on how to satisfy these cravings without going overboard, i'd love to hear it.

i know we are encouraged to do clean, natural eating while on this kickstart, so would making my own peanut butter be a way to do that, as opposed to buying the store brands? plus, the 'natural' kinds are quite expensive, and i don't feel comfortable around a whole jar of the stuff. i'd like to blend my own and maybe add some cinnamon or raisins for sweetness - and fiber!

i just get so hard on myself and angry, that i can't seem to be the ideal vegan that i want to be. did anyone feel this way starting out? i don't want to give up though...maybe at first, is it okay to take it slowly, rather than immediately go cold-turkey?

RE: feel defeated, how to get back on track
Posted Thursday, July 11, 2013 at 7:09 AM

There is no "wrong" way to adopt a healthier diet. And I doubt anyone would claim to have the ideal diet 100% of the time.

My suggestion with products that you find hard to resist is to quite literally never buy them. It's not that a teaspoon of peanut butter would be so bad, but it's when you can't resist the whole jar. I have a similar problem with peanut butter, which is why I never keep it in the house! Perhaps your parents could support you in this buy not buying your trigger foods either.

Maybe you could make another choice when you want to eat something "bad." Like go for a walk, or eat an apple first, or do a couple of yoga poses or sit ups. Take the money you would have spent on junk food and put it in a jar - savings for your own place to live someday.

Don't beat yourself up, regardless! You are clearly very thoughtful about your food choices, which puts you way ahead of most.

Susan

Susan Levin, MS, RD
PCRM Director of Nutrition Education

RE: feel defeated, how to get back on track
Posted Friday, July 12, 2013 at 10:19 PM

I, too, have found it best not to buy foods I've had a tendency to over-eat, inc. cashews and some nut butters. I just started my 8th week of eating vegan/much healthier overall and definetly have learned to avoid getting very hungry, for that's one circumstance in which I'm most inclined to make poor choices (both quantity and quality). It also helps to forgive myself kindly when I don't eat as well as I'd like and reflect on what factors contributed to such behavior. Taking time to consider what may be pressing me to give in to some less than good food choices, as well as reminding myself I likely won't be pleased w/ the outcome if I act on same (i.e., I'll feel stuffed, be disappointed in myself) has also helped me. I feel more energetic, have lost weight (18 pounds), and have peace re. being vegan (in comparison to having been vegetarian for many years)---i remind myself of these results and it helps me stay motivated. I appreciate how difficult change can be, especially when under duress--may you find some peace/relief by reflecting on the healthy choices you make Smile


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