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Forums: Main Kickstart Forum: Oils & Fats in Salads
Created on: 04/07/13 09:13 PM Views: 945 Replies: 5
Oils & Fats in Salads
Posted Sunday, April 7, 2013 at 9:13 PM

Following Dr. Bernard's recommendations for Reversing Diabetes, as well as the general recommendations of Dr. Esselstyn, I avoid salad dressings which have any oil or fat. My wife said that she had read that some fat is necessary in salads in order to get the benefits of the greens and we found an article, the source of which I could not identify which contained the following:

"Salad greens contain important minerals like magnesium, potassium, calcium, iron, manganese and zinc, and also beneficial molecules known as phytonutrients or phytochemicals. It’s important to eat a small amount of a healthy oil with salad greens, since nutrients such as beta carotene and vitamins E and K are fat soluble. They need the presence of fat in order to be absorbed through the wall of our small intestine."

I would appreciate some knowledgeable feedback on the efficacy of that suggestion. I have no idea of what a "small amount" means.

Thanks

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RE: Oils & Fats in Salads
Posted Sunday, April 7, 2013 at 9:29 PM

I have a somewhat related question about oils, specifically extra virgin olive oil and the oil present in nuts.

I understand that in the most recent edition of The New England Journal of Medicine, there appeared the results of a study of the Mediterranean diet,. In sum, there were three groups: those who were told to consume extra virgin olive oil, those who were told to incude nuts, and the control group, whose participants were told to maintain a low fat diet.

From what I know, at the end if the study, the olive oil and the nut group had a much lower incidence of cardiovascular events than the low fat diet. Given these results, is it still advisable to eliminate all fats in our diets to the extent possible?

RE: Oils & Fats in Salads
Posted Sunday, April 7, 2013 at 10:52 PM

As to the salad and fat question, there is fat in vegetables already, so nature has the eat-fat-with-your-veggie-vitamins already handled.

Regarding the study with oil, nuts and low-fat diet, the low-fat diet wasn't really low fat. Many people consider 30% fat to be low - that is what we get told by the media and health organizations (I think American heart assoc is still pushing 30%). The fat in this diet was even higher (37%). Dr Mcdougall has a great explanation of this study and fats in general at http://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2013other/news/oil.htm. His website has a wealth of great information. Dr Esselstyn also has great info in his book, Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease. He found a huge positive impact on heart health by eliminating added fat and fatty foods. It is a great read, and I just bought the book for the recipes!

RE: Oils & Fats in Salads
Posted Monday, April 8, 2013 at 8:14 AM

As was noted, there's already a small amount of fat in just about every living thing (just as there's a wee bit of protein in every living thing as well). That's one reason that eating whole rather than processed foods is a better idea - you're eating the nutrients, fats, protein, etc. in combination without having to add stuff to "balance" it. Eating a variety of foods pretty much covers it - oh, and go for the darker leafies from romaine onward (spinach, chard, kale, etc.) and get away from the 'wedge salad' concept of a chunk of iceberg dunked in dressing.

--DebR

RE: Oils & Fats in Salads
Posted Wednesday, April 10, 2013 at 10:48 AM

Okiebenz wrote:

Following Dr. Bernard's recommendations for Reversing Diabetes, as well as the general recommendations of Dr. Esselstyn, I avoid salad dressings which have any oil or fat. My wife said that she had read that some fat is necessary in salads in order to get the benefits of the greens and we found an article, the source of which I could not identify which contained the following:

"Salad greens contain important minerals like magnesium, potassium, calcium, iron, manganese and zinc, and also beneficial molecules known as phytonutrients or phytochemicals. It’s important to eat a small amount of a healthy oil with salad greens, since nutrients such as beta carotene and vitamins E and K are fat soluble. They need the presence of fat in order to be absorbed through the wall of our small intestine."

I would appreciate some knowledgeable feedback on the efficacy of that suggestion. I have no idea of what a "small amount" means.

Thanks

Okiebenz I'm glad you brought this up and am happy to see the replies and links you've already gotten!

It's true, fat is essential and whole plant foods have them - even garbanzo beans deliver something like 14% of their calories from fat. And broccoli - has omega 3's in it. At least non-GMO broccoli does, which is one of the big arguments against the GMO movement. Removing the omega 3 component increases shelf life. This directly affects our health.

It's amazing how when we see 'low fat' we think we know what it means. Always have to read between the lines it seems!

Lani

Lani Muelrath, M.A. CGFI, CPBN
Fit Quickies: The Plant-Based Fitness Book

www
RE: Oils & Fats in Salads
Posted Thursday, April 11, 2013 at 8:50 PM

I appreciate the responses to my original question. I finally traced down the study to being one in 2004 by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. An excerpt from an article commenting on the study:

"Vegetables commonly found in salads are essentially fat-free and are a rich source of healthy carotenoids. In order for these carotenoids to be absorbed by the human digestive system, fat is needed. But researchers say exactly how much fat is needed to provide optimal absorption of these nutrients is not clearly defined.

In the study, which appears in the August issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers compared nutrient absorption after eating salads with varying levels of fat.

Seven healthy men and women ate salads of spinach, romaine lettuce, cherry tomatoes, and carrots topped with Italian dressings containing 0, 6 (0.2 ounces), or 28 grams (almost 1 ounce) of canola oil on different occasions during a 12-week period. Hourly blood samples were taken for 11 hours after the meal and tested for nutrient absorption.

The study found that only negligible amounts of alpha- and beta-carotene and lycopene were detected in the blood after eating a salad with fat-free dressing. Significantly more of these substances, known as carotenoids, were detected in the blood after eating salads with reduced-fat dressing or full-fat dressings.

Researchers say this study shows that the minimum amount of fat required for optimal absorption of these nutrients from the salads is more than 6 grams of added fat. But because salads are often consumed with other items that contain fat, the use of a reduced-fat salad dressing may still allow the body to reap the maximum nutritional benefits of fresh vegetables."

I would appear from that study that the fat content within the typical salad ingredients are NOT sufficient to facilitate absorption of all nutrients and that a separate small source of fat is necessary. However, that could be from a good source such as nuts or seeds or avocados rather than some sort of dressing.

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