21-Day Vegan Kickstart

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Forums: Main Kickstart Forum: UK group
Created on: 01/04/13 10:01 AM Views: 3420 Replies: 16
UK group
Posted Friday, January 4, 2013 at 10:01 AM

Hi. I'm wondering if there are any others from the UK on the Kickstart programme? It would be good to be able to swap notes on how you're doing and where to get some of the ingredients; I don't even know what some of them are! Laughing

RE: UK group
Posted Friday, January 4, 2013 at 3:26 PM

I'm an American living in Germany married to an Englishman.
You'd be welcome to PM me if you need help with some of the recipes! I find the food shopping pretty bleak sometimes in Germany (I can't even buy sweet potatoes without making a half hour trip to town) so maybe I can help you out with some ideas of what to substitute.
I always find that England has a better selection of exotic vegetables, fruits and spices than here but I guess those are not American foods.

RE: UK group
Posted Saturday, January 5, 2013 at 6:13 PM

Thanks for the offer of help Beatrice. I have managed to source blue corn chips, which I'm very excited about and can't wait for them to arrive! Here's a list of things I'm unsure about:
apple butter, marinara sauce, Yukon Gold potato, wheat orzo pasta, tamari, white/yellow miso. Am I right in thinking 'cilantro' is parsley and 'zucchini' are courgettes?

RE: UK group
Posted Sunday, January 6, 2013 at 1:36 AM


Quote:

Thanks for the offer of help Beatrice. I have managed to source blue corn chips, which I'm very excited about and can't wait for them to arrive! Here's a list of things I'm unsure about:
apple butter, marinara sauce, Yukon Gold potato, wheat orzo pasta, tamari, white/yellow miso. Am I right in thinking 'cilantro' is parsley and 'zucchini' are courgettes?

apple butter is a thick applesauce with spices used as a spread on bread. I think plain old applesauce (buy the sugar free kind if you can find it) also tastes good on bread. Or you could make your own apple butter, there are recipes online.
Marinara sauce I thought was just tomato (meat-free) spaghetti sauce? I make my own using onion, garlic, mushroom, tomato sauce, canned tomatoes, and stock then freeze or can for later. You can also buy it (maybe it goes by a different name there?)
As for the potato I would just use a normal potato and the orzo pasta I would use some kind of whole grain like barley, brown rice or wheat berries to give texture to the recipe. Don't forget to check the cooking time and add the grain at the right time in the recipe.
The last 2 ingredients sound like Japanese ingredients. I skip those recipes, so I won't be much help how to substitute them. If you have an Oriental market (and the time) it would be worth a try.
Zucchini is courgettes but cilantro is coriander. Parsley gives the right color but not as strong a flavour. I get coriander at the market, the supermarkets do not carry it here.

Edited 01/06/13 1:38 AM
RE: UK group
Posted Sunday, January 6, 2013 at 5:06 AM

Ah! Coriander...have been getting that completely wrong! Thanks for your help Very Happy

RE: UK group
Posted Monday, January 7, 2013 at 10:32 AM

Cilantro is not parsley - it is the greenery/seasoning used in things like chili, guacamole, etc. It's like a spicier parsley maybe. Looks similar to parsley but it's not. I think it's also used in some types of Asian cooking. It's not particularly hard to grow indoors (probably need a plant grow light to get enough sun during the winter). We grow a related plant, papalo, outdoors here in CT in the summer - it can handle the vagaries of this climate a bit better when growing outdoors (we tried cilantro and it died). Cilantro is a very distinctive flavor - and for some it tastes like soap. There's some genetic 'quirk' involved with that - some tastebuds taste it as a spice/seasoning and others taste it as unpleasantly soapy.
--DebR

RE: UK group
Posted Monday, January 7, 2013 at 11:32 AM

Wasn't sure what a courgette was so I googled courgette images and yes, it's a zucchini (or at least it looks the same).

--DebR

RE: UK group
Posted Wednesday, January 9, 2013 at 1:56 PM

Found Tamari sauce today; still haven't located miso, except for the soup. Can anyone tell me what the UK version of Graham's Crackers would be?

Had blue corn chips today - too moorish; need to lock them away!

RE: UK group
Posted Thursday, January 10, 2013 at 8:42 AM

graham crackers? They'd be in the "biscuit" aisle in the grocery (biscuit UK = cookie US I think).

--DebR

RE: UK group
Posted Thursday, January 10, 2013 at 11:15 AM

Thanks Deb, so like a plain sweet biscuit??

RE: UK group
Posted Thursday, January 10, 2013 at 11:19 AM

claremus wrote:

Thanks Deb, so like a plain sweet biscuit??

Graham crackers are made with graham flour, rather than plain wheat flour (graham flour is a coarser flour). So, read the label and look for 'graham flour' - it's quite texturally different from 'whole wheat' or 'unbleached white' flour. Similar to the way semolina flour, used in pastas often, is different as well.

Or, if you want to give it a go, look for graham flour and google for recipes to make "graham crackers". It looks pretty simple but I haven't yet tried the recipes I've seen.

--DebR

RE: UK group
Posted Thursday, January 10, 2013 at 3:36 PM

I haven't seen the recipe but I think any whole grain, low sodium cracker would work.
Graham crackers are slightly sweet, I am suprised to learn they are a health food but then again sometimes a tasty ingredient makes an otherwise healthy recipe go down better.

RE: UK group
Posted Thursday, January 10, 2013 at 4:39 PM

beatrice30 wrote:

I haven't seen the recipe but I think any whole grain, low sodium cracker would work.
Graham crackers are slightly sweet, I am suprised to learn they are a health food but then again sometimes a tasty ingredient makes an otherwise healthy recipe go down better.

They can be, but just like anything else, check the ingredients. Some grahams are made using honey - so check that (it's not vegan); some use partially hydrogenated fats - not good; some use HFCS - definitely not good (but probably not an issue in the UK since they don't use HFCS over there as far as I know). And, some use molasses which can be a good iron source as well as adding a bit of sweet. We do a "shortcut" pumpkin pie recipe by mixing solid pack pumpkin (canned, just pumpkin, or home grown and canned ourselves) with pie spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, etc), a bit of molasses, raw sugar (if needed, depending on the sweetness of the pumpkin) then spreading it on graham crackers and topping, if desired, with mimicreme for a treat (it's a whipped cream sub made using cashew and almond butters - tasty for a treat, not a routine thing). Hit on this one back when son was a toddler and couldn't wait hours for a pumpkin pie (especially back then when eggs and cream meant that it had to be thoroughly baked). I'd scoop out a little of the mix before the milk and eggs were added and make him a couple "shortcut pies" and he'd toddle off happily while the actual pie baked.

--DebR

RE: UK group
Posted Friday, January 11, 2013 at 8:44 AM

Do you do any baking with a crumb crust rather than a dough pie crust? Whatever you use for that would likely be the equivalent of "graham crackers". You might even google graham cracker images to see what they look like - you might find that you already know what they are by a different name (like zucchini - courgette Smile )

--DebR

RE: UK group
Posted Friday, January 11, 2013 at 11:34 AM

beatrice30 wrote:


As for the potato I would just use a normal potato

That's a good substitute, but if you can get your hands on a Yukon Gold, I would. It's a little creamier/buttery texture than the regular potato. It's my favorite.

beatrice30 wrote:


The last 2 ingredients sound like Japanese ingredients. If you have an Oriental market (and the time) it would be worth a try.

Yep, you will find them in Asian markets. Tamari is a gluten free soy sauce, so you can substitute with soy sauce.

Miso paste is fermented soybeans, and a little harder to find, so I would check health food stores or Asian markets.

beatrice30 wrote:


cilantro is coriander.


Really? Because I have both in my pantry. Is coriander just a more ground up version?

RE: UK group
Posted Friday, January 11, 2013 at 11:43 AM

Jodie wrote:


beatrice30 wrote:

cilantro is coriander.


Really? Because I have both in my pantry. Is coriander just a more ground up version?

Cilantro is the leafy tops, coriander is the seeds (either whole or ground). There is a difference in flavor as well as the different look (a sprinkling of bright green cilantro adds a perky touch). I suppose a sprinkling of chopped parsley plus a bit of ground coriander would hit both color and close to the right flavor. Go really easy with the ground coriander though since it's a more concentrated flavor than the leaves.

--DebR

RE: UK group
Posted Friday, January 11, 2013 at 4:26 PM

Yes, coriander produces both a seed which is sold whole or ground, and is brown in color, not to be confused with the leafy part of the plant which is sold fresh or dried and is of course green. In Germany and, judging by my cookbooks, in the UK, both products--the brown one and the green one--are called coriander.

Apparently from what you guys are saying, in the US the leaf and the seed have different names--how much more practical! I remember sending my husband to the market for coriander and being disappointed when he came back with ground coriander, which I already had....

Edited 01/11/13 4:29 PM


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