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Forums: Main Kickstart Forum: stevia pros / cons?
Created on: 02/21/14 03:41 AM Views: 565 Replies: 5
stevia pros / cons?
Posted Friday, February 21, 2014 at 3:41 AM

I have to watch my sugars - not only do i have a very bad sweet toothe, I mean - a very strong craving for sweets / sugars...I also need to be careful as diabetes runs strong in family.

I've heard great things about Stevia. What are your thoughts, opinions? I do not want to give up sugars entirely because, that might set me up to crave and eat even MORE and unhealthy things.

I don't like to use any of these other artificial sweeteners, many are linked to cancer and tested on animals which is terrible. And so, I wondered, how safe / good does Stevia work?

Thanks everyone - I say and believe it every day, this community is a treasure!

RE: stevia pros / cons?
Posted Friday, February 21, 2014 at 9:49 AM

For me, stevia has an unpleasant aftertaste and I feel a little odd if I have more than a drop in a day - not sure what that is. Also, I think it's another of those situations where it registers as "sweet=calories coming" but since there are no calories your body ends up wanting to eat more than if you just had a small amount of something that hit both sweet and calories - like a banana smoothie or something.

I've lately been making a 'candy bar' that the whole family loves - found recipe on FB (a friend posted it from somewhere else, just disclaimering because it's not original to me).

Equal parts coconut oil and raw cocoa powder
half as much maple syrup or honey (cannot use agave)
vanilla
salt

melt coconut oil in a saucepan. remove from heat. whisk in cocoa powder. add the rest of the ingredients (vanilla and pinch of salt) and whisk thoroughly. I keep whisking until it cools a bit.
Pour into a parchment lined pan (like a brownie pan - the bigger the pan, the thinner the candy, can go from barklike thin to Chunky bar thick)
Refrigerate 30 minutes. Whisk briefly to reincorporate any sweetener that separates out. Refrigerate a couple more hours or overnight. Cut into chunks, store in closed container in fridge.

The good thing is you can make anywhere from a whole 'batch' of this to just a wee amount at will. I make a 1 cup, 1 cup, 1/2 cup batch to make candy bar thick stuff with raisins and peanuts mixed in for general eating but I made a 1/2 cup, 1/2 cup, 1/4 cup batch (no mixins) to use to coat some granola bars I made - mimics the packaged things but it's vegan and has no 'fractionated' or questionable ingredients. I've even given bits to non-veg friends and they love it. It's very dark and rich and satisfying so only a little goes a long way

--DebR

RE: stevia pros / cons?
Posted Friday, February 21, 2014 at 10:34 AM

Tasting sweeteners may trigger your body to produce insulin and make you feel hungrier.

When you crave a sweet, why not choose a serving of a fruit or berries as a snack? Most fruits and berries -- except cantaloupe, guava, papaya, watermelon, and pineapple -- are low glycemic foods which contain needed nutrients, are digested slowly, and have fiber to give you a satisfying sense of feeling full after you eat them. For more information, please see this PCRM fact sheet on diabetes: http://www.pcrm.org/pdfs/health/diabetes/diet%20and%20diabetes-recipes%20for%20success.pdf

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RE: stevia pros / cons?
Posted Friday, February 21, 2014 at 2:44 PM

Thanks guys for your feedback. Deb - sounds awesome, i'll have to try! I'm also trying to figure out some idea for salty / non-sweet snacks. Most of my classmates and peers are always tlaking about seafoods and tuna cans etc for easy snacks that help with protein and not having 'sweet' items..but of course that idea alone makes my stomach un-well! To each their own of course.

Do you imagine having something more salty or bitter could also get rid of the sweet craving?

Oh and I agree, I really don't understand why many ppl love stevia. it's a very strange aftertaste to me.

RE: stevia pros / cons?
Posted Friday, February 21, 2014 at 2:56 PM

Have you tried kale chips? You can buy them or it is pretty easy to make them either in the oven or with a dehydrator. There are lots of recipes on the web.

RE: stevia pros / cons?
Posted Friday, February 21, 2014 at 3:18 PM

kittens09 wrote:

Thanks guys for your feedback. Deb - sounds awesome, i'll have to try! I'm also trying to figure out some idea for salty / non-sweet snacks. Most of my classmates and peers are always tlaking about seafoods and tuna cans etc for easy snacks that help with protein and not having 'sweet' items..but of course that idea alone makes my stomach un-well! To each their own of course.

Do you imagine having something more salty or bitter could also get rid of the sweet craving?

Oh and I agree, I really don't understand why many ppl love stevia. it's a very strange aftertaste to me.

Dill pickle spears - for some reason pickles can help with sweet cravings, go figure. That's my go to because it's pretty easy to find anywhere.
Cooked chickpeas (warm or cold) with a sprinkle of salt is almost like peanuts. Even better, after they cook (or right from the can, well rinsed), give them a quick roast in the oven to get that dry roasted crunch too. Travels well in a small container (I occasionally bring these guys to work for a snack in the afternoon).
Popcorn (sans butter or oil - you can put 1/4 cup of kernels - I think it's 1/4 cup, you don't want too much in there - in a plain brown paper lunch bag, no oil, and pop it in the microwave, and you've got the brown bag to eat it from so minimal cleanup) - a sprinkle of nutritional yeast gives it a salty kinda parmesan flavor. Sometimes I'll do a mix of salt, cinnamon and a tiny bit of sugar (evap cane juice) on popcorn to get a salty sweet crunchy result that is just right.
Sliced veg (celery, carrot, bell pepper) with hummus to dip - or hummus with any kind of good whole grain cracker.

--DebR


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