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Forums: Main Kickstart Forum: Organic gardening tip
Created on: 03/10/13 08:21 AM Views: 1124 Replies: 5
Organic gardening tip
Posted Sunday, March 10, 2013 at 8:21 AM

When I first read this suggestion I didn't beleive it would work, but I've used it successfully. Plant marigolds with your tomato plants. Insects are repelled by the scent of the marigolds. To fertilize, I use homemade compost, made using kitchen scraps throughout the year. Save seeds from previous harvests and there's no reason for your garden to cost more than the work required to plant and harvest it! Happy gardening! What other gardening tips can anyone contribute?

Jennifer

Edited 03/10/13 4:18 PM
RE: Organic gardening tip
Posted Monday, March 11, 2013 at 9:30 AM

There are a lot of 'symbiotic' relationships - tomato and basil grow well together. "Three sisters" work well - corn, squash, beans - corn acts as a beanpole, beans are nitrogen-fixers (help the soil), and squash's broad low leaves help keep the soil moist for it's sisters to grow.

--DebR

RE: Organic gardening tip
Posted Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 8:13 AM

I planted 14 cute baby kale plants yesterday. Its so exciting! This is only my 2nd attempt at gardening. The parsley from last year came back up. I have some broccoli to plant. I'd also like to plant collard greens if I can find them at a nursery. I also would like to plant cilantro. After I planted the kale, I put lawn grass clippings around them. Anyone else start planting a garden or plan to?

RE: Organic gardening tip
Posted Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 10:12 AM

We've already got abundant chives, thyme and oregano growing (since they're perennials, they just keep coming back and spreading without much work on our part). And, we've got some 'volunteer' lettuces that decided to pop up from last year's crop. This weekend we put in curly leaf parsley (just one to see if we like it and how it does in our garden). We put in papalo (like a lemony cilantro that grows better than cilantro in our New England climate) - just one because they get so huge and abundant that one is all we can manage! Smile Two Genovese basil and two black cherry tomato seedlings (tomato and basil grow well near each other). Then we planted radishes and giant sunflowers. We've got a lettuce mix that we'll plant in the fall for either a late harvest or, more likely, an early spring harvest.

We transplanted some thyme and chives to an area where we took down a larger shrub - we're using them as edible ground cover.

--DebR

RE: Organic gardening tip
Posted Wednesday, May 29, 2013 at 9:11 AM

That was fun hearing about your gardening, Deb R.
That's so cool about the chives, thyme, and oregano that return the next year. Great tip about lemony cilantro as the cilantro I planted last year didn't do well. I always wanted to have a big sunflower, a natural birdfeeder, cool! I googled on youtube how to plant kale, how to plant broccoli, etc. I am a beginner gardener but I have been telling myself: like with a lot of things in life, its supposed to feel uncomfortable when you are new at something and then with practice and experience it becomes really fun. Seems like with gardening, a little work now, then the rewards come later.

RE: Organic gardening tip
Posted Wednesday, May 29, 2013 at 10:47 AM

veganer wrote:

That was fun hearing about your gardening, Deb R.
That's so cool about the chives, thyme, and oregano that return the next year. Great tip about lemony cilantro as the cilantro I planted last year didn't do well. I always wanted to have a big sunflower, a natural birdfeeder, cool! I googled on youtube how to plant kale, how to plant broccoli, etc. I am a beginner gardener but I have been telling myself: like with a lot of things in life, its supposed to feel uncomfortable when you are new at something and then with practice and experience it becomes really fun. Seems like with gardening, a little work now, then the rewards come later.

Starting with perennial herbs like chives is what I'd recommend for new gardeners - they tend to be very hardy and forgiving - we don't weed, water occasionally if it's been really dry, and just snip what we want when we want it during the season, then snip it all down (haircut time!) and dry it in the oven for winter use.

Yup, the big sunflowers are fun when the birds start eating on them. We usually watch for the birds to go at it, then we take one of the smaller heads and shake out a handful or so of seeds to store for the following year and leave the rest for them. We didn't let 2011's seeds dry thoroughly so when we planted them last year, they just didn't germinated (they probably got moldy/rotten over the winter). So, we had to get more seeds this year. Fortunately, we have access to all sorts of organic and heirloom seeds without having to order by mail or online. And, the seedlings we get are also from an organic and heirloom local farm.

--DebR


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