21-Day Vegan Kickstart

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Forums: April 2012 Kickstart Forum: Taste Density
Created on: 05/18/12 02:28 PM Views: 2924 Replies: 11
Taste Density
Posted Friday, May 18, 2012 at 2:28 PM

One of the problems I find with the calorie density theory is that when you water down the calorie content of your food, you also water down the taste.

I therefore find that I use more seasonings and more salt on a low density food, like cous cous for instance. Plus it doesn't fill me up for as long as the dense foods do.

Has any of you guys had success following the principles of calorie density ?

Wash your back

RE: Taste Density
Posted Friday, May 18, 2012 at 8:07 PM

I don't know that I really follow the calorie density concept. I eat lots of fruits and vegetables, greens and salads. But I also eat quinoa, brown rice, potatoes, sweet potatoes. I basically follow the McDougall plan and starch is the main part of your meal. I find it very satisfying most of the time.

Vikki ~

RE: Taste Density
Posted Saturday, May 19, 2012 at 7:34 PM

Wild4Stars wrote:

I don't know that I really follow the calorie density concept. I eat lots of fruits and vegetables, greens and salads. But I also eat quinoa, brown rice, potatoes, sweet potatoes. I basically follow the McDougall plan and starch is the main part of your meal. I find it very satisfying most of the time.

Oh dear. It seems as if you're inadvertantly following the principles of calorie density and having great success. So I guess it's just me that's having a problem. Quinoa, brown rice and potatoes are starches but they're all low in calorie density. Unless your eating them in their dry state of course. Part of me hopes that you are, because then I wouldn't feel like such an oddball for finding these calorie sparse foods so unsatiating and so in need of some salt.

Wash your back

RE: Taste Density
Posted Saturday, May 19, 2012 at 8:22 PM

For the record, my diet is also starch-based, but my main starch is bread, and apparently bread is a calorie dense food and is getting frowned upon in recent times. Not only because of it's calorie density but also because it has apparently had it's fiber disrupted by the milling process and because it's surface area has increased compaired to the intact whole grain, or something. And flour is more prone to oxidation.

I have no idea whether there's any evidence that flour products have a negative effect on health and longevity compared to intact wholegrains, but I don't particularly care, because if I try and take bread out of my diet then I run into problems. Like spending £50 at Wholefoods and still feeling hungry type of problems. Or spending half the day eating and still feeling hungry.

Vicki, are you out there ? Where are you ? I'm talking to you.

Wash your back

RE: Taste Density
Posted Saturday, May 19, 2012 at 8:39 PM

When I was on Eat To Live and the limited grains and starches I craved pasta. I mean CRAVED pasta. I would resist until I couldn't resist anymore and them just binge on pasta. Once I moved to the McDougall WOE I added potatoes back to my diet. I no longer have those powerful pasta cravings. Do I still like pasta? Yes. Do I still eat it now and then? Yes. But I no longer have those feelings of "I'll kill somebody if I don't get a ton of pasta today" feelings.

Maybe bread is calorie dense but nutrient deficient. You're eating it but you're body isn't getting the nutrients it needs? I don't know. I have never been a big bread person.

Vikki ~

RE: Taste Density
Posted Sunday, May 20, 2012 at 10:39 AM

theodore wrote:

For the record, my diet is also starch-based, but my main starch is bread, and apparently bread is a calorie dense food and is getting frowned upon in recent times. Not only because of it's calorie density but also because it has apparently had it's fiber disrupted by the milling process and because it's surface area has increased compaired to the intact whole grain, or something. And flour is more prone to oxidation.

There is a difference between freshly milled whole wheat flour and the stuff that is in the sack on the grocery shelves. For one thing, any whole grain contains within it a small drop of oil (wheat germ oil for instance) and oil will oxidize when exposed to air. That's one reason why most store bought corn meal is kind of bitter tasting - the corn oil is oxidized. Freshly milled, however, is a whole other thing because the oxidation is minimal before using it. Our flour goes from wheat berry to baked good (bagels, tortillas, pizza dough, whatever) in a matter of minutes. Any small amount leftover (we try to just grind what we need right then, but sometimes there is a little leeway, like with how much is needed on the kneading board to make bread) is stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator to slow oxidation and used ASAP.

--Deb R

RE: Taste Density
Posted Monday, May 21, 2012 at 1:05 PM

.

Wash your back

Edited 07/29/12 12:40 PM
RE: Taste Density
Posted Monday, May 21, 2012 at 1:10 PM

Bugsmom wrote:

There is a difference between freshly milled whole wheat flour and the stuff that is in the sack on the grocery shelves. For one thing, any whole grain contains within it a small drop of oil (wheat germ oil for instance) and oil will oxidize when exposed to air. That's one reason why most store bought corn meal is kind of bitter tasting - the corn oil is oxidized. Freshly milled, however, is a whole other thing because the oxidation is minimal before using it. Our flour goes from wheat berry to baked good (bagels, tortillas, pizza dough, whatever) in a matter of minutes. Any small amount leftover (we try to just grind what we need right then, but sometimes there is a little leeway, like with how much is needed on the kneading board to make bread) is stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator to slow oxidation and used ASAP.

Interesting, Deb. I mean interesting for the other Kickstart members. I of course knew this already and was just about to say it.

Wash your back

RE: Taste Density
Posted Monday, May 21, 2012 at 2:06 PM

theodore wrote:


Interesting, Deb. I mean interesting for the other Kickstart members. I of course knew this already and was just about to say it.

Of course you knew, Theodore - I knew you knew it and I know you know that I knew you knew Wink

--Deb R

RE: Taste Density
Posted Monday, May 21, 2012 at 2:40 PM

Bugsmom wrote:


Of course you knew, Theodore - I knew you knew it and I know you know that I knew you knew Wink

Spot on, Deb.

Wash your back

RE: Taste Density
Posted Monday, May 21, 2012 at 7:48 PM

If you're eating good quality bread, you're head and shoulders above most everyone else. I've never been a big bread eater. Typically we don't eat a loaf of bread before it goes bad.

Pasta on the other hand never has a chance to go bad!! Very Happy

Vikki ~

RE: Taste Density
Posted Tuesday, May 22, 2012 at 8:18 AM

Wild4Stars wrote:

If you're eating good quality bread, you're head and shoulders above most everyone else. I've never been a big bread eater. Typically we don't eat a loaf of bread before it goes bad.

Pasta on the other hand never has a chance to go bad!! Very Happy

We only make loaf type bread when it's going to be used up ASAP, like for a holiday meal with family. Bagels and tortillas are our all-around go to items, and even then they generally get eaten before they go bad. From the time the wheatberries are ground until the time the last of whatever is eaten is usually somewhere under 72 hours. Then we make more as needed.

We found that when we started only having bread if it was freshly homemade, we eat a lot less bread and enjoy it more when we have it.

--Deb R


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