21-Day Vegan Kickstart

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Forums: Main Kickstart Forum: foods that keep you feeling stuffed.
Created on: 02/27/14 02:14 AM Views: 354 Replies: 5
foods that keep you feeling stuffed.
Posted Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 2:14 AM

I am on my 9th day of being vegan but I find myself hungry all the time. I pop tomatoes in my mouth like they are candy when I am hungry. What can I make to keep me and my daughter from feeling hungry all the time. HELP!!! we are doing sooo good and I don't miss the dairy at all or the meat. Smile

RE: foods that keep you feeling stuffed.
Posted Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 5:19 AM

Potatoes. They're filling, satisfying and yummy. Potatoes are good for you and they can easily be fixed many ways without oil or other added calories. When I put potatoes back in my diet cravings went away and I started losing weight again.

Vikki ~

RE: foods that keep you feeling stuffed.
Posted Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 5:44 AM

What are you feeding yourself and your daughter for breakfast?

We make old fashioned oatmeal every morning. We top it with flaxseed, kiwis, raspberries, blueberries and bananas.
We also serve it with half of a grapefruit, freshly squeezed orange juice, and whole wheat bread and jam.

We are so full, we cannot possibly eat anything until time for dinner.

RE: foods that keep you feeling stuffed.
Posted Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 6:23 AM

Agree with the experts above!! BIgger meals, especially breakfast. There are no limits on grains, fruits, vegetables, and beans! Other snacks to keep on hand include fruit, dried fruit, pretzels, hummus, baked chips, salsa, and low-fat crackers.

Susan Levin, MS, RD
PCRM Director of Nutrition Education

RE: foods that keep you feeling stuffed.
Posted Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 8:36 AM

Fiber and protein are what keep you feeling full after eating. So, for example, my hubby puts a spoonful of 'just peanuts' peanut butter on his oatmeal in the morning. Keeps him full (including an hour on the treadmill) until lunch most days. Tomatoes are yummy but they're mostly water - make yourself a small salad with some real leafies (spinach, kale, romaine, etc.) to add fiber to the mix, then top it with cold beans (chickpeas are my fav for this but any bean you've got will do). Yes, it takes a little more time to make and eat a salad but the alternative, as you've noted, is having to keep going back looking for more of 'something'. I've taken to prepping the lettuce(s) and popping a medium salad's worth into ziptop bags - squeezing out the air as I seal them means I can stack them easily in the fridge instead of having bulky heads of lettuce or a big bowl sitting in there. I can open the bag, throw in some grape tomatoes, cold chickpeas, maybe some dried cranberries and slivered almonds, zip it back up and head to work with a salad in a bag - if necessary, I could eat it right from the bag (but I have access to fridge and bowls, forks, etc. here at work).

We make a peanut butter granola ball (it's for bars but the balls are more portable and easier to manage than bars) that packs everything you might want into a two bite size - one of them and you're good to go. It's got nut butter, dried fruit, rolled "old fashioned" oats, cinnamon, nutmeg, maple syrup (the real kind, not 'pancake syrup'). They're simple to make, keep well, and two of those plus a fresh fruit smoothie (strawberry banana is our favorite) is just about a meal.

--DebR

RE: foods that keep you feeling stuffed.
Posted Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 8:51 AM

For me, if I want something heavy, I find Lara Bars, beans, avocados, sweet potatoes and nuts/nut butters are very filling.


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