21-Day Vegan Kickstart

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Forums: September 2012 Kickstart Forum: Hypothyroid and Soy
Created on: 08/30/12 10:36 AM Views: 2014 Replies: 9
Hypothyroid and Soy
Posted Thursday, August 30, 2012 at 10:36 AM

Hello! I'm new to this program and desperate to find something that will help me get healthy and lose weight. A friend of mine suggested I try the 21 day vegan program. I was diagnosed with Hypothyroid (Hassimoto's) a couple of years ago. Soy is a big no no from what I've read. Is that true? and if so, is there another meatless alternative for me?
Thank you so much for your inputs.
Kim

RE: Hypothyroid and Soy
Posted Thursday, August 30, 2012 at 10:51 AM

Kadaki wrote:

Hello! I'm new to this program and desperate to find something that will help me get healthy and lose weight. A friend of mine suggested I try the 21 day vegan program. I was diagnosed with Hypothyroid (Hassimoto's) a couple of years ago. Soy is a big no no from what I've read. Is that true? and if so, is there another meatless alternative for me?
Thank you so much for your inputs.
Kim

There are TONS of options that aren't soy. Beans, lentils, quinoa are all proteins that aren't soy. There's also a wheat-based meat alternative called seitan - but it tends to be salty and expensive. Much easier/better to just go with beans etc.

I've been (mostly) vegan since I did the first kickstart a few years ago and I don't eat tofu or drink soy milk or do any of that 'bulk' soy because I don't tolerate it well (there's enough 'background' soy in the food chain that big chunks are just too much for me YMMV).

--Deb R

RE: Hypothyroid and Soy
Posted Thursday, August 30, 2012 at 10:54 AM

HI,
Most of my favorite foods don't include soy. You won't have any trouble finding delicious food that will meet all your needs.
I only eat tofu once every couple of weeks or so.. it would be just as easy to leave it out.

Edited 08/30/12 10:54 AM
RE: Hypothyroid and Soy
Posted Thursday, August 30, 2012 at 11:34 AM

thank you ladies for the insight. I appreciate it. Looking forward to starting this new journey.

RE: Hypothyroid and Soy
Posted Thursday, August 30, 2012 at 11:37 AM

"Soy is a big no no from what I've read. Is that true?"

I have Hashimoto's Thyroiditis as well, and have not heard about the soy issue (and have been eating it). Could you please share the resources that you have been reading? I'd like to check out the information.

Thanks in advance!

RE: Hypothyroid and Soy
Posted Thursday, August 30, 2012 at 6:54 PM

If you are taking medication for your hypothyroid, then soy might be an issue. You can scroll down to the thyroid section of our latest soy research summary here: http://www.pcrm.org/health/health-topics/soy-and-your-health

Susan Levin, MS, RD
PCRM Director of Nutrition Education

RE: Hypothyroid and Soy
Posted Thursday, August 30, 2012 at 7:33 PM

Thank you, Susan, for responding!

I do take a daily low-dose medication for Hashi's; I recently had my thyroid hormone levels checked (I get my levels checked every 6 months or so) and they were fine. Based on my most recent labs, it seems that the amount of soy that I eat isn't reducing the absorption of the thyroid hormone, Levothyroxine, that I take to treat my hypothyroidism.

Regarding the uptake of iodine by isoflavones, I was informed that Levothyroxine already contains iodine (do you know if this is accurate?).

Based on the info you have shared and what I have shared above, I think I should be able to continue to consume the soy products. Of course, I will still continue to get my thyroid levels checked periodically and will work with my doc to make sure that I'm taking the correct amount of hormone to keep my Hashi's in check.

RE: Hypothyroid and Soy
Posted Thursday, August 30, 2012 at 8:41 PM

Check with your health care professional (doc, pharamicist, etc.) about the iodine content. It may be in there, but I'm not certain.

I do want to highlight what was pointed out above, which is there are scores of beans besides soy which you can enjoy. Soy is not mandatory, and variety is good for so many reasons!

Susan Levin, MS, RD
PCRM Director of Nutrition Education

RE: Hypothyroid and Soy
Posted Sunday, September 2, 2012 at 8:08 AM

hi guys, i'm a little worried now as I read this thread...as I'm currently working and residing in Vietnam, I do like to have tofu or soya milk occasionally and it might be hard otherwise to get in good/sufficient protein and nutrients otherwise. There's a lot of meat in this country, despite the Buddhist influences!

Of course, I don't have tofu and soy alone, and enormous quantities...for example, I estimate probably 2-3 servings of soy milk at most, in a day...usually with coffee/tea so it's probably about 1/2 cup at most for each serving.

Then, if I have tofu, it's usually along with other things like rice or vegetables, or in a soup. I hope this is not anything to be too worried about.

I thought also, that the soy controversy was more about the 'fake' meats, which are not really here as far as I can tell. The soy products here at least are not processed and contain very few, and simple ingredients.

RE: Hypothyroid and Soy
Posted Sunday, September 2, 2012 at 8:30 AM

Don't be concerned. This thread is specifically about how soy can react with medications for hypothyroidism -- people in that situation would need to make sure they get enough iodine in the diet.

There is no danger in consuming soy. However, variety is always good in anyone's diet, so if you do have access to other types of beans, you should enjoy those as well.

Susan Levin, MS, RD
PCRM Director of Nutrition Education


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