21-Day Vegan Kickstart

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Forums: Main Kickstart Forum: Super Bowl and Beyond
Created on: 01/30/13 12:56 PM Views: 1396 Replies: 6
Super Bowl and Beyond
Posted Wednesday, January 30, 2013 at 12:56 PM

HELP!!! I'm going to a SuperBowl party this Sunday. We always watch the game, but mostly talk, eat, and have a couple of beers. The hostess always has a huge spread of appetizers, then a big Italian meal. I'm wondering about what to do so I can continue with my vegan diet and have good time without causing a big fuss. I let her know about my diet and let her know that I would bring a salad, an appetizer, and a veggie burger for myself. She replied in an email that other than some veggies, everything would have meat or dairy including desert. She also said be careful with this diet because a friend of hers got sick and was told by her doctor to stop eating vegan. Then she said she lowered her blood sugar just by putting cinnamon on everything. These are the first friends that I eat with regularly so I'm not sure what else they'll say to me. She's pretty opinionated and will say what she thinks without thinking. I'm kind of nervous that they will not be supportive of my choice to eat this way for my health. What should I eat? How to respond to questions or even criticism about this way of eating?

RE: Super Bowl and Beyond
Posted Wednesday, January 30, 2013 at 1:50 PM

Thanks for the post. I think what you are going through or may go through soon is unfortunately common among people making healthful lifestyle choices. For some friends and family, it can seem threatening. Or maybe they are truly concerned because they do not understand the facts. Either way, they will see soon enough by your example what it means to take control of one's health. It's not a judgment on their dietary choices nor is it anything but positive for your health! From there, we can only hope they will be happy for you and maybe even take control themselves.

As for the Super Bowl...you may be the bringer of own food! Which isn't a bad thing. You could ask the host to set aside some plain pasta for you, to which you add your vegies and/or even a small jar of marinara sauce. My guess is that you will have the most delicious meal of all, and others will only wish they were eating such beautiful food! This Italian dinner sounds a little fancier than my usual football fare, but if appropriate, finger foods could be any of the following: baked chips and salsa, popcorn, hummus and pita, bruschetta and tomato/basil topping, etc!

Susan Levin, MS, RD
PCRM Director of Nutrition Education

RE: Super Bowl and Beyond
Posted Wednesday, January 30, 2013 at 1:57 PM

with the exception of my son, his wife and my husband, almost my entire family thinks my diet it EXTREME!!! (lol) I would just bring snacks that you can eat. I'd wouldn't bring anything that needed to be heated up, this way you aren't in your hostess way in the kitchen. My family used to tell me all the times about the DANGERS of a vegan diet. It will be 3 years this February and I'm still here. If she starts giving you grief just say oh let's just watch the game. Go 49er's!!

RE: Super Bowl and Beyond
Posted Wednesday, January 30, 2013 at 3:05 PM

off hand guess, her friend was eating a junk food vegan diet - there are lots of high fat, high sugar, high salt, vegan foods - pasta with marinara is vegan but is often low fiber, high fat, salt, sugar. Potato chips and french fries are vegan. Chips and salsa are vegan. But a steady diet of that is not a healthy way to eat, even if it is vegan. For that matter, just eating salad and tofu is not all that healthy - there needs to be a bunch of other stuff in there as well (fruit, other veggies, other proteins and grains).
--DebR

RE: Super Bowl and Beyond
Posted Wednesday, January 30, 2013 at 3:05 PM

off hand guess, her friend was eating a junk food vegan diet - there are lots of high fat, high sugar, high salt, vegan foods - pasta with marinara is vegan but is often low fiber, high fat, salt, sugar. Potato chips and french fries are vegan. Chips and salsa are vegan. But a steady diet of that is not a healthy way to eat, even if it is vegan. For that matter, just eating salad and tofu is not all that healthy - there needs to be a bunch of other stuff in there as well (fruit, other veggies, other proteins and grains).
--DebR

RE: Super Bowl and Beyond
Posted Wednesday, January 30, 2013 at 5:47 PM


Quote:

She also said be careful with this diet because a friend of hers got sick and was told by her doctor to stop eating vegan

I have had similar statements made to me a couple of times when someone learns about my goal to be 100% vegan. More often than not I try not to mention it because there is always that one person who finds it necessary to be discouraging.

As Susan Levin said, above, some people find it threatening. I think most people realize on some level that consuming foods laden with saturated fats and other characteristics of a carnivorous diet is, ultimately, very unhealthy; yet, transitioning to a vegan diet is not easy. I think those who criticize this choice are actually jealous that they do not have the self-discipline to embark upon a way of eating that is so healthy.

RE: Super Bowl and Beyond
Posted Sunday, February 3, 2013 at 5:30 PM

Most physicians are not well-versed in plant-based nutrition so I would take his advice with a grain of salt. Perhaps the person who did not do well was not including a wide variety of plant foods in sufficient quantities. Some new vegans just drop the meat but do not include beans and whole grains and lots of veggies.

However, if you are on this site following the healthy Kickstart guidelines, you have no need to worry!


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