21-Day Vegan Kickstart

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Forums: January 2012 Kickstart Forum: vegan with food allergies
Created on: 01/04/12 11:01 AM Views: 2981 Replies: 6
vegan with food allergies
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 at 11:01 AM

need suggestions for vegan when someone has food allergies to soy, legumes, gluten, dairy, preservatives (sulfites), egg, shellfish

RE: vegan with food allergies
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 at 11:06 AM

minnieim wrote:

need suggestions for vegan when someone has food allergies to soy, legumes, gluten, dairy, preservatives (sulfites), egg, shellfish

Quinoa products for one - protein but not gluten, soy, legume (the dairy, egg, shellfish is easy since they're not vegan to start with). There are quinoa based pasta products, breads, etc (of course, as you know, always check the ingredients and the allergen warnings). Not to mention simply cooking quinoa itself. Add to vegetable soups, serve cold in salads (the way you might use brown rice, for example, in a salad), make casseroles (broccoli, quinoa, vegan cheezy sauce - the one we make uses cashews, there are other recipes as well - for example).

I know there are others on here who deal with some or all of the same issues so they can probably chime in with more ideas.

--Deb R

Edited 01/04/12 11:08 AM
RE: vegan with food allergies
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 at 11:42 AM

We do have a helpful guide under the 21 Day Menu:

Navigating the New Four Food Groups with a Food Allergy or Intolerance
Focus on the following grains and starches if you have a gluten intolerance:

Oats (find the GF ones, Bob’s Red Mill is a common brand)
Quinoa
Rice: brown, wild, etc.
Gluten-free pasta
Buckwheat
Millet
Corn
Potatoes
Sweet potatoes
Amaranth
Load up on other legumes if you have a soy intolerance:

Beans: black, kidney, lime, pinto, white, mung, adzuki, garbanzo
Lentils: red, green, black, yellow, brown, French
Peas: snow peas, snap peas, garden peas
Rice milk or almond milk, fortified with vitamin B12, calcium, and vitamin D, instead of soymilk
Eat a Variety of vegetables:

Dark leafy greens are a good source of calcium, with a more absorbable form than cow’s milk
Broccoli (made up of 33 percent protein!) and other cruciferous vegetables like kale, cabbage, and cauliflower have anti-cancer fighting properties
Eat the rainbow of veggies: red peppers, yellow squash, carrots, beets, spinach, tomatoes, sweet potatoes, onions, and others
Fill up on fruits:

Eat any and all fruits you like – the more variety in colors the better
Think yellow, orange, blue, green, and beyond
Note: It is important to supplement with vitamin B12 or a multivitamin.

Resources:
The Gluten-Free Vegan by Susan O’Brien
WholeGrainsCouncil.org/Whole-Grains-101/Gluten-Free-Whole-Grains
Vegiac.com/Forums/Index.php
GlutenFreeVegan.Wordpress.com
FatFreeVegan.com/Gluten-Free/Index.shtml

RE: vegan with food allergies
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 at 11:43 AM

We do have a helpful guide under the 21 Day Menu:

Navigating the New Four Food Groups with a Food Allergy or Intolerance
Focus on the following grains and starches if you have a gluten intolerance:

Oats (find the GF ones, Bob’s Red Mill is a common brand)
Quinoa
Rice: brown, wild, etc.
Gluten-free pasta
Buckwheat
Millet
Corn
Potatoes
Sweet potatoes
Amaranth
Load up on other legumes if you have a soy intolerance:

Beans: black, kidney, lime, pinto, white, mung, adzuki, garbanzo
Lentils: red, green, black, yellow, brown, French
Peas: snow peas, snap peas, garden peas
Rice milk or almond milk, fortified with vitamin B12, calcium, and vitamin D, instead of soymilk
Eat a Variety of vegetables:

Dark leafy greens are a good source of calcium, with a more absorbable form than cow’s milk
Broccoli (made up of 33 percent protein!) and other cruciferous vegetables like kale, cabbage, and cauliflower have anti-cancer fighting properties
Eat the rainbow of veggies: red peppers, yellow squash, carrots, beets, spinach, tomatoes, sweet potatoes, onions, and others
Fill up on fruits:

Eat any and all fruits you like – the more variety in colors the better
Think yellow, orange, blue, green, and beyond
Note: It is important to supplement with vitamin B12 or a multivitamin.

Resources:
The Gluten-Free Vegan by Susan O’Brien
WholeGrainsCouncil.org/Whole-Grains-101/Gluten-Free-Whole-Grains
Vegiac.com/Forums/Index.php
GlutenFreeVegan.Wordpress.com
FatFreeVegan.com/Gluten-Free/Index.shtml

RE: vegan with food allergies
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 at 11:47 AM

Beans and legumes are also not tolerated. Legumes are a key protein source. We get severe headaches with inadequate protein.

RE: vegan with food allergies
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 at 12:19 PM

minnieim wrote:

Beans and legumes are also not tolerated. Legumes are a key protein source. We get severe headaches with inadequate protein.

Most whole grains contain protein (and even vegetables contain protein!). Quinoa is packed with it. Add in some nuts/nut butters if needed (if you just can't get what you need from quinoa et al). it won't be low fat if you add a lot of nut products but sometimes you've got to make a trade off here and there.

Some folks also find that they don't react as badly to certain things once they've removed meat and dairy from their systems. So, they can have *occasional* beans or lentils without a bad reaction. Obviously, if it's an allergy that requires an epipen, that's nothing to mess with, but if it's a digestive intolerance, there might be a chance to add a wee bit occasionally once the system gets a chance to detox and relax a bit.

Many people have digestive 'issues' when moving to a whole food vegan style of eating - not used to all the real fiber. Gas, bloating, bound or loosened bowels, that kind of thing. That's when to ease back on the beans/lentils but keep going (add more greens and grains for a bit) and it sorts out before the 3 weeks is up usually.

--Deb R

RE: vegan with food allergies
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 at 4:32 PM

I'll reiterate what was stated above - protein is found in all whole foods, not as much in fruit, but lots in grains (even processed grains) and vegetables, including starchy vegetables such as potatoes, and of course nuts and seeds. An allergy to legumes is frustrating as it is one of the healthiest foods we can eat.

I always suggest that one confirm two things before eliminating all legumes because of an allergy:
1. It is in fact an allergy and not an intolerance.
2. It really is all legumes as opposed to one or two legumes - some more common allergens are found in peanuts and soy.

Nevertheless, one can do just fine without legumes in the diet. Thankfully, there are plenty of nutritious foods growing from the ground and trees to provide us with everything we need.

Susan Levin, MS, RD
PCRM Director of Nutrition Education


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