21-Day Vegan Kickstart

New Topic Reply Subscription Options   Previous Page  Page: 1   Previous Page

Forums: January 2012 Kickstart Forum: Using Kickstart for Recovery After A Heart Attack
Created on: 01/05/12 10:03 AM Views: 2808 Replies: 13
Using Kickstart for Recovery After A Heart Attack
Posted Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 10:03 AM

I had a heart attack 9 months ago and started the 21 day Kickstart being very strict on no oils or foods that contain a lot of natural oils (avocados, olives, nuts, etc...).

The results have been amazing. 9 months ago I had to stop walking up hill to rest, now I can sprint up the hill 10 times. I'm running over 20 miles a week with a long run of 6 miles. With my cardiologist approval I have discontinued one heart medication and cut the other two in half. My BMI is perfect.

My body produces a lot of cholesterol apparently. Even with this diet I have to take a low dosage statin to reduce my LDL below 70 as mandated by my cardiologist.

Is there anything else dietary that I can do to get off the statin?

check it out
Posted Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 10:12 AM

I would get a second opinion from a vegan doctor or two on your below 70 reccomendation. You have a vegan body which has new limits...those statins are not good!

RE: Using Kickstart for Recovery
Posted Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 10:15 AM

Dontx wrote:

I had a heart attack 9 months ago and started the 21 day Kickstart being very strict on no oils or foods that contain a lot of natural oils (avocados, olives, nuts, etc...).

The results have been amazing. 9 months ago I had to stop walking up hill to rest, now I can sprint up the hill 10 times. I'm running over 20 miles a week with a long run of 6 miles. With my cardiologist approval I have discontinued one heart medication and cut the other two in half. My BMI is perfect.

My body produces a lot of cholesterol apparently. Even with this diet I have to take a low dosage statin to reduce my LDL below 70 as mandated by my cardiologist.

Is there anything else dietary that I can do to get off the statin?

Sounds great! And, no, there may not be anything else dietary you can do. I know someone who could live on lettuce leaves and water and run 10 miles per day and still have high cholesterol results. His dad had it, his sister has it, I think some of the grandparents had it. Genes do play a role - unfortunately for some, fortunately for others. My hubby is also on a statin because try as he might, his cholesterol picture was not enough changed by vegan eating to reduce the risk factor of his genes. On the other hand, I inherited my dad's lovely cholesterol picture - lots of HDL, not a lot of LDL - my doctor always looks at the individual pieces rather than the total (to start with) because the high HDL level skews the results (I average an HDL of about 65-70 and an LDL between 70 and 90). Vegan eating helps me maintain things - as a diabetic, my doctor wanted me on a statin ASAP. But, we have an agreement - so long as I can maintain my cholesterol profile well within the target ranges, no statin.

--Deb R

Using Kickstart for Recovery After A Heart Attack
Posted Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 10:21 AM

Sounds like you are doing great. Keep up the great work with your diet, keeping ALL the fats low and consuming no animal products. Fiber pulls out the excess cholesterol, so hopefully the bulk (pardon the pun) of your diet is whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and legumes, as opposed to processed foods. This will ensure as much fiber as possible to keep carrying out the cholesterol that your body is making.

It is up to your doctor of course about the statin drug recommendation. I can not comment on when and if you should reduce or eliminate those medications.

Susan Levin, MS, RD
PCRM Director of Nutrition Education

re:
Posted Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 11:39 AM

Dontx wrote:

I had a heart attack 9 months ago and started the 21 day Kickstart being very strict on no oils or foods that contain a lot of natural oils (avocados, olives, nuts, etc...).

The results have been amazing. 9 months ago I had to stop walking up hill to rest, now I can sprint up the hill 10 times. I'm running over 20 miles a week with a long run of 6 miles. With my cardiologist approval I have discontinued one heart medication and cut the other two in half. My BMI is perfect.

My body produces a lot of cholesterol apparently. Even with this diet I have to take a low dosage statin to reduce my LDL below 70 as mandated by my cardiologist.

Is there anything else dietary that I can do to get off the statin?

Dontx, thanks for posting and this brings up a good point.

At the Advanced Nutrition Study Weekends for the McDougall Health and Medical Center, Dr. McDougall makes a point of underscoring that the numbers can be indicators yet do not necessarily tell the whole story.

If someone has had a scan that shows clear carotids - without the calcificaion build-up indicating the progression of heart disease - AND they are practicing a whole foods, low fat plant-based diet without added oils and fats, then the numbers on the lipid profile are not as important. I know, we look to them as indicators. But he says that he has seen women patients who have clear arteries, are doing all the right things, and still have high cholesterol numbers. This can be especially true of post-menopausal women. It can be reassuring and also perhaps a good reason to persist with best practices no matter what.

Lani

Arrow facebook too

Lani Muelrath, M.A. CGFI, CPBN
Fit Quickies: The Plant-Based Fitness Book

www
RE: Recovery After A Heart Attack
Posted Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 1:04 PM

Sorry - this doesnt answer your question about statins and you have probably read the book - but if not I recommend
Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease - Caldwell Esselstyn Jr, M.D.

His diet is similar to kickstart but he says no oils at all and gives his explanation of why. Its important for me to know the whys behind someones recommendations and not just do this and do that. While I still have a little oil sometimes, usually when eating out, this book motivates me to keep it very low and I have learned how to cook without.

While I dont personally have heart problems at present there is a history in my family so i need to think about preventive measures as much as possible. Not only was this book an informative read but some of the recipes in the second half of the book are great. His 'Simple No-Tahini Hummus' is a standard in my house now.

Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food - Hippocrates.

Edited 01/05/12 1:06 PM
RE: check it out
Posted Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 1:32 PM

HVANWINKLE wrote:

I would get a second opinion from a vegan doctor or two on your below 70 reccomendation. You have a vegan body which has new limits...those statins are not good!

I KNOW the statins are not good. I was on them, got off them, (LDL 100) had a heart attack and now back on. Dr. Esselstyn recommends LDL below 80, Dr. Gould and Dr. Sdringola at the Weatherhead Center for Preventing and Reversing heart disease in Houston recommends below 70 LDL. My Cardiologist 70 LDL. The Vegan and non Vegan Doctors agree that those like myself with heart disease the LDL has to remain extra low to be heart attack proof. I still have problem areas and do not want a bypass.

I keep a vigil searching for any animal products, dairy, fat, or unknown "natural" ingredients in everything I eat. Like others here I spend a lot of time reading labels. 75% of items in the grocery store are off the menu!

I met with Dr. Sdringola in Houston and hope to join the Century Study in a year.
I have read Dr. Esselstyn book I went to an E2 Emersion where he spoke. When I talked with him he spoke about shaving the cholesterol medicine to the lowest limit possible (with his dietary restrictions) and still maintain a low LDL. From the initial prescription after the heart attack I have reduced the statins in half. I'll see over time if the new lifestyle will allow me to reduce the statins more. I keep thinking there has to be something more to do. Thanks.

http://www.uth.tmc.edu/pet/century-study/?src=d1

RE: Kickstart for Recovery After A Heart Attack
Posted Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 7:19 PM

Another resource with other suggestions for lowering cholesterol naturally is Dr. Joel Fuhrman's book Cholesterol Protection for Life

RE: check it out
Posted Friday, January 6, 2012 at 6:05 AM

Dontx wrote:

HVANWINKLE wrote:
I would get a second opinion from a vegan doctor or two on your below 70 reccomendation. You have a vegan body which has new limits...those statins are not good!

I KNOW the statins are not good. I was on them, got off them, (LDL 100) had a heart attack and now back on. Dr. Esselstyn recommends LDL below 80, Dr. Gould and Dr. Sdringola at the Weatherhead Center for Preventing and Reversing heart disease in Houston recommends below 70 LDL. My Cardiologist 70 LDL. The Vegan and non Vegan Doctors agree that those like myself with heart disease the LDL has to remain extra low to be heart attack proof. I still have problem areas and do not want a bypass.

I keep a vigil searching for any animal products, dairy, fat, or unknown "natural" ingredients in everything I eat. Like others here I spend a lot of time reading labels. 75% of items in the grocery store are off the menu!

The comment that you keep a vigil looking for ingredients and spend a lot of time reading labels suggests to me that you may be eating a lot of processed foods. Experiment with eating whole, natural foods. Fresh fruits and vegetables. WHOLE grains, brown rice, quinoa, instead of whole wheat bread or pasta. If you use canned beans make sure they are "no salt." The ingredient list should read "beans, water." PERIOD.

"The most important thing to remember about food labels is that you should avoid foods that have labels." ~ Dr. Joel Fuhrman

Vikki ~

RE: check it out
Posted Friday, January 6, 2012 at 6:17 AM

Dontx wrote:

HVANWINKLE wrote:
I would get a second opinion from a vegan doctor or two on your below 70 reccomendation. You have a vegan body which has new limits...those statins are not good!

I KNOW the statins are not good. I was on them, got off them, (LDL 100) had a heart attack and now back on. Dr. Esselstyn recommends LDL below 80, Dr. Gould and Dr. Sdringola at the Weatherhead Center for Preventing and Reversing heart disease in Houston recommends below 70 LDL. My Cardiologist 70 LDL. The Vegan and non Vegan Doctors agree that those like myself with heart disease the LDL has to remain extra low to be heart attack proof. I still have problem areas and do not want a bypass.

I keep a vigil searching for any animal products, dairy, fat, or unknown "natural" ingredients in everything I eat. Like others here I spend a lot of time reading labels. 75% of items in the grocery store are off the menu!

The comment that you keep a vigil looking for ingredients and spend a lot of time reading labels suggests to me that you may be eating a lot of processed foods. Experiment with eating whole, natural foods. Fresh fruits and vegetables. WHOLE grains, brown rice, quinoa, instead of whole wheat bread or pasta. If you use canned beans make sure they are "no salt." The ingredient list should read "beans, water." PERIOD.

"The most important thing to remember about food labels is that you should avoid foods that have labels." ~ Dr. Joel Fuhrman

Vikki ~

RE: check it out
Posted Friday, January 6, 2012 at 2:46 PM

Wild4Stars wrote:


The comment that you keep a vigil looking for ingredients and spend a lot of time reading labels suggests to me that you may be eating a lot of processed foods.
"The most important thing to remember about food labels is that you should avoid foods that have labels." ~ Dr. Joel Fuhrman

Fuhrman is absolutely right.

I don't eat a lot of processed foods. It's just a needed quest I have to search for foods that don't contribute to heart disease. Kind of like an Easter egg hunt. There is not a lot out there with no oil or animal products. When I finally do find something the nutritional value is so low all it does is spike my triglycerides.

Sometimes I run across an unexpected surprise like, Nacho Mamas Queso, or a hummus with no fat.

RE: check it out
Posted Friday, January 6, 2012 at 3:12 PM

Dontx wrote:

Wild4Stars wrote:

The comment that you keep a vigil looking for ingredients and spend a lot of time reading labels suggests to me that you may be eating a lot of processed foods.
"The most important thing to remember about food labels is that you should avoid foods that have labels." ~ Dr. Joel Fuhrman

Fuhrman is absolutely right.

I don't eat a lot of processed foods. It's just a needed quest I have to search for foods that don't contribute to heart disease. Kind of like an Easter egg hunt. There is not a lot out there with no oil or animal products. When I finally do find something the nutritional value is so low all it does is spike my triglycerides.

Sometimes I run across an unexpected surprise like, Nacho Mamas Queso, or a hummus with no fat.

If you make your hummus, that's one less label to read. I think that was the point, if you buy ingredients (beans, grains, etc) you can make the same foods right to your own needs without reading a single label (or reading very little, like checking sodium levels if you buy canned beans or tomato sauce). We do that because between hubby's cholesterol and blood pressure and my type 2 diabetes, not to mention a rapidly growing 13 yr old son, it's WAY easier (including prep time) to just buy ingredients rather than increase my already-extensive grocery shopping time (comparing ingredients as well as prices).

Hubby is the head cook in the house (he's a stay at home dad to our always homeschooled son and has multiple projects and a couple of home businesses he's involved in) and he treats it like a workshop, finding quick and easy ways to make the stuff we like. Good, basic, ingredients, some good cookbooks and websites (like the recipes on here and in the linked references), and some good quality tools (he spends on high end kitchen equipment the way some guys spend on wood working or car repair tools - we look for restaurant grade stuff because of how heavily we use things like blenders and food processor, and our grain mill was a great investment several years ago - it paid for itself pretty quickly compared to the cost of decent quality bread type products. Investing in a really good big pressure cooker has made cooking beans of all sorts really easy - we can set them to soak at breakfast and then cook them in under 20 minutes total for dinner).

For instance, today he's dicing up potatoes, carrots, sweet potatoes, turnips, parsnips, onion and adding that to leftover cut up butternut squash (the other half went into last night's chili!). About half (give or take, depending on the size of the things) will end up in tonight's root veggie hash (we toss in cooked beans as well, plus seasonings). The other half will go into the fridge and probably end up as a lovely hearty soup over the weekend (with beans and/or some type of grain added as well). When he cooks beans, he cooks enough for 3 or 4 meals and we store portioned containers in the fridge - we go through several pounds of beans per week (black beans, navy beans, pintos, garbanzos)
Or, he might chop the red and green cabbage in the fridge and add the root veggies to that casserole style (almost but not quite entirely unlike corned beef and cabbage Laughing ) Lots of cook once, eat twice (or more - leftovers are lunches or combined into new dinners - leftover chili plus leftover rice or pasta is a great combo; son will use leftover rice to make the breakfast rice pudding type thing - heat it with plant milk, add raisins, cinnamon and a little agave maybe or real maple syrup).

--Deb R

Using Kickstart for Recovery After A Heart Attack
Posted Monday, January 9, 2012 at 7:55 PM

Deb R - Do you ever loan your husband out ??

Vikki ~

RE: Using Kickstart for Recovery
Posted Monday, January 9, 2012 at 8:29 PM

Wild4Stars wrote:

Deb R - Do you ever loan your husband out ??

Laughing I've had people ask many times but you'd need to be nearby for that to work out.

--Deb R


New Topic Reply Subscription Options   Previous Page  Page: 1   Previous Page
Subscription Options
Subscription options are available after you log in.

There are 166 active user sessions right now.

home | contact us | about us | support us | full disclaimer | privacy policy

PCRM Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
5100 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Ste. 400, Washington, DC 20016
Phone: 202-686-2210 | E-mail: pcrm@pcrm.org