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Forums: January 2012 Kickstart Forum: Food and Nutrition Myths
Created on: 01/12/12 10:41 PM Views: 1434 Replies: 6
Food and Nutrition Myths
Posted Thursday, January 12, 2012 at 10:41 PM

What nutritional myths exist either about veganism or about traditional diets and what are the truths?

For example, I'm tired of hearing about the body's demands on protein for strength training or carbs for cardio training when it seems that a simple "balanced" plant-based diet that gives your body the essential building blocks to synthesis what it needs for the purpose at hand is all that is necessary.

What other food and nutrition myths are being thrown in your face when you say that you are a vegan?

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RE: Food and Nutrition Myths
Posted Thursday, January 12, 2012 at 11:46 PM

I would think the calcium issue. Commercials have so many people convince that "milk does a body good" that many don't realize that dairy protein does the opposite - it doesn't help the bones but can weaken them.

The other one I get called out on is my low fat diet. Actually I get a lot of resistance from meat eaters, and have learned just not to engage.

Always offer kindness and a soft word to the beings around you; You do not know their journey. Your words can be the hug they need or the shove that breaks them.

RE: Food and Nutrition Myths
Posted Friday, January 13, 2012 at 7:58 AM

Oceandog wrote:

I would think the calcium issue. Commercials have so many people convince that "milk does a body good" that many don't realize that dairy protein does the opposite - it doesn't help the bones but can weaken them.

The other one I get called out on is my low fat diet. Actually I get a lot of resistance from meat eaters, and have learned just not to engage.

Even folks who may acknowledge that adults don't necessarily need milk still think it's absolutely essential for children to have some dairy - whether it's milk, cheese, yogurt, or whatever. When actually what they need are calcium, protein, fat and so on. All nutrients that can be found in other places once the child is no longer nursing (able to eat table food).

--Deb R

RE: Food and Nutrition Myths
Posted Friday, January 13, 2012 at 8:06 AM

Three square meals per day is the best way to eat. Many people still believe this even though it's been shown that for many people half a dozen smaller bites per day is a healthier way to go, especially for keeping blood sugar levels more stable.

--Deb R

RE: Food and Nutrition Myths
Posted Friday, January 13, 2012 at 2:16 PM

Olive oil is heart healthy (usually spoken by a fat TV chef while pouring it on a salad).

RE: Food and Nutrition Myths
Posted Friday, January 13, 2012 at 2:21 PM

smday wrote:

Olive oil is heart healthy (usually spoken by a fat TV chef while pouring it on a salad).

then again, compared to pouring heavy cream based dressings on a salad, I suppose it is - relatively speaking. And, using olive oil means no deep fat frying (olive oil has way too low of a smoke point to fry with) which is also a good thing, relatively speaking.

--Deb R

RE: Food and Nutrition Myths
Posted Saturday, January 14, 2012 at 3:47 AM

Just to add to this thread, I thought I would list the most common myth...

Myth: all vegans are slim alternative hippy type people.

Truth:
* Many of us struggle with weight.
* We are not all hippy's.
* We are alternative in that many of the worlds populaton continues to eat meat
* There is a lot of vegan junk food around that makes eating well a little harder.

Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food - Hippocrates.

Edited 01/14/12 4:21 AM


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