21-Day Vegan Kickstart

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Forums: Main Kickstart Forum: Support
Created on: 01/02/13 01:16 PM Views: 1084 Replies: 6
Support
Posted Wednesday, January 2, 2013 at 1:16 PM

I am a long time (about 4 years) mostly vegan (with some slip ups here and there, days where I indulge in things like cheese). However it has not had a positive affect on my weight and I am still struggling to lose weight.

I am 25 years old and doing the kickstart again as a way to hopefully clean up my diet and and "kickstart" my weightloss.

I'm looking for anyone else in a similar situation who would like to share our struggles and successes and be cheerleaders for each other. I'm also very well versed in being vegan and happy to share support and suggestions on that front.

Looking forward to getting to know folks!

RE: Support
Posted Wednesday, January 2, 2013 at 2:22 PM

We went vegan a year ago and didn't lose any weight until we cut out the processed foods. Then I lost 10-12 lbs within a 6 week period. Wishing you good luck.

RE: Support
Posted Thursday, January 3, 2013 at 1:35 PM

I think your direction is probably where I need to head to....processed foods are killer! And it's so hard to stay away from them when you're so busy and have so little time. Thanks for the reply Smile

RE: Support
Posted Thursday, January 3, 2013 at 1:59 PM

veganvictuals wrote:

I think your direction is probably where I need to head to....processed foods are killer! And it's so hard to stay away from them when you're so busy and have so little time. Thanks for the reply Smile

It really isn't harder if you set your mind to it and think "How can I prep once and cook twice (or more)?" If you're cooking rice, it doesn't take much if any extra time to cook 2 cups of rice instead of 1 cup for the current meal. Ditto for beans - cook double when you cook them. When you've got the time to chop celery, onion, carrots, bell peppers, double it. Store half. (onions and peppers freeze well if you plan to use them in soup or chili - they lose crispness when thawed so not as great for salads and such). Then mix and match things. That's one good thing about the kickstart - it encourages using day 2 dinner leftovers for day 3 lunches and so on. And, it's a MENU plan. Kickstart way back when (two years ago?) got us started using menu planning each week (or two week cycle, to match the bulk of the grocery shopping). So, if we have chili on Monday, we'll have extra beans to use in a beans & rice dish on Tuesday. Then, we can use chili over pasta or potatoes on Wednesday. Extra rice cooked on Tuesday can be the base for a stir fry on Thursday. Extra veggies chopped on Thursday are the base for a crock pot soup on Friday. Saturday can be leftovers (to clean the fridge out) or if there are no leftovers, something simple like pancakes for dinner (or salad/wraps in warmer weather). Sundays are a bit catch as catch can depending on what is scheduled. Following Monday, maybe a root veggie hash. Again, extra veg chopped up and used later in the week in a hearty soup or even tossed into the chili (we do chili weekly, year round - it's an easy crock pot recipe and even easier than the meat kind because you don't have to thaw and brown the meat ahead of time!) Beans cooked to go with the hash become part of nachos and the cheese sauce from the nachos becomes a potato topping with some steamed broccoli.

When we've got a stash of bits (beet tops, carrot ends, etc), we'll take an afternoon (weekend usually) and make a big batch of veggie stock to freeze. That means we can have a "stone soup" together in minutes either stove top or crock pot.

Learning how to handle grains is also a biggie. Rice, quinoa, barley, millet, etc. They are all basically similar and some things, like quinoa, cook even faster than doing rice! A go-to meal that is simple (and I think came from a kickstart recipe) is to cook some quinoa in veg stock (or water). Then use stock again to sweat onions and garlic then lightly wilt some greens (kale, spinach, etc). Add cooked chickpeas and the quinoa, mix, heat through. Season as desired (salt and pepper, soy sauce or Braggs aminos, spices if you like it spicy - curry, cumin, etc). Dinner is served in 30 minutes or less (depending on how big a quantity you are cooking and all - if you cook double the quinoa, you can reuse it in soup or other things later on).

A good whole grain pasta is also good to keep on hand for those in a pinch days (even though it is a processed food). Heat a can of crushed tomatoes, with some salt, pepper, Italian herbs, garlic, onions, mushrooms (if you have some handy), beans (whatever you've got in the pantry or fridge - adds protein and a meatier texture/look). That's a nice, simple, "minimally" processed sauce that takes minutes while the pasta cooks.

A big helper for us is a good pressure cooker/canner. We can cook potatoes in minutes and then finish them in the oven for a little crispy outside while the broccoli is steaming. Likewise, soaked beans can be cooked quickly in a pressure cooker (bring it up to pressure then turn off the heat - by the time the pressure drops enough to open the cooker, the beans are cooked!) Saves on energy usage too.

--DebR

RE: Support
Posted Thursday, January 3, 2013 at 9:00 PM

Bugsmom wrote:

[quote="veganvictuals"]
A big helper for us is a good pressure cooker/canner. We can cook potatoes in minutes and then finish them in the oven for a little crispy outside while the broccoli is steaming. Likewise, soaked beans can be cooked quickly in a pressure cooker (bring it up to pressure then turn off the heat - by the time the pressure drops enough to open the cooker, the beans are cooked!) Saves on energy usage too.

--DebR


I ordered the Instant Pot, it should arrive on the 7th (according to the tracking). I'm so excited. I already received Lorna Sass' book "Great Vegetarian Cooking Under Pressure". Hoping to read through the tips before I get the pressure cooker, then I can start right away when I get it.

RE: Support
Posted Friday, January 4, 2013 at 12:49 PM

I'm excited to hear how your pressure cooker exploration goes! I'd always been under the impression that the only thing you can really cook in a pressure cooker is chili.

This week has been pretty rough for me health/vegan wise - just got back from the holidays, returning to work - things have been complicated. Planning to return strong this weekend/next week and looking forward to it!

RE: Support
Posted Friday, January 4, 2013 at 1:19 PM

veganvictuals wrote:

I'm excited to hear how your pressure cooker exploration goes! I'd always been under the impression that the only thing you can really cook in a pressure cooker is chili.

This week has been pretty rough for me health/vegan wise - just got back from the holidays, returning to work - things have been complicated. Planning to return strong this weekend/next week and looking forward to it!

Nah - we do chili either stove top or slow cooker, never pressure cooker. I suppose if you're cooking the beans at the same time, then maybe but all the other veggies would be mush by the time you were done. Beans, potatoes, squash are all things we've done under pressure - it'll cook fast and then they can be finished any way you like (a quick bit in the oven for crispy/browned, added to soup stock for a fast dinner, whatever).

--DebR


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